Talk:Marzipan's Answering Machine Version 11.2

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[edit] Easter egg

Does anyone have any clue what that easter egg is all about? --Hobo

I think it might just be The Brothers Chaps making fun of that Polish guy. -Daheiji

[edit] Closed STUFF

[edit] Fifty frickin' wings (DECLINED)

The King's line "fifty frickin' wings" could be referring to Fricker's, a restaurant famous for their "frickin' chicken wings."

  • Neutral I've never head of Fricker's. →evin290 14:50, 25 Jan 2005 (MST)
  • Decline Could've sworn I've seen this one submitted before...if not, theres still not much to go on with this one proof wise.Donny vs Universe
  • Accept It doesn't get any clearer than this.
  • Is it in Georgia or thereabouts? If not it's probably not a reference. I'm not going to say accept or decline since I don't have an actual username. I used to but I forgot it.
  • Accept I support this one because I do not think TBC would use the word "frickin'" to sound like a well known four-letter word in the english language. --BegyLips
  • Accept! However, i've only seen Frcikers in Ohio, but who knows...
  • Revise A touch more information on Fricker's is needed, such as where the chain can be found. Eujensc 17:14, 20 Feb 2005 (MST)
  • Decline because I doubt TBC has heard of Fricker's either. According to their website, they're only located in Ohio, save for two restaurants in Fort Wayne and Richmond (Indiana). ISlayedTheKerrek 07:36, 2 Mar 2005 (MST)
    • Second. They probably decided on "frickin'" for the same reason Fricker's did: it sounds like "chicken". --Beatfox 20:10, 19 Apr 2005 (UTC)
    • Second. -- tomstiff 20:33, 19 Apr 2005 (UTC)
    • Comment. Here's a Frickin' link!
  • Weak accept. It's still possible, as TBC may have visited Ohio and/or Indiana once or twice. --Trogga 20:12, 8 Mar 2005 (MST)
  • Accept. I live in ATL, and could swear that I've seen that placr a couple times. --clashman 18:55,9 Mar 2005 (MST)
  • Decline Decline, the word "frickin'" used before "wings" means nothing to me. Are there even Frickers' in Atlanta?

[edit] Message 2 Translation

Okay, so we've gone through several translations for message 2:

  1. "Hi Marzipan, it's Łukasz! If you are ready to leave, please come over. I will be at home. So, see you soon." [1]
  2. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz speaking. Would you care for some ice-cream? Please phone me. I'll be home, as usual." [2]
  3. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Would you care for some ice-cream? Please phone me. I'll be home, as usual. [3]
  4. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Do you have a desire to take a flight? Please phone me. I'll be home, as usual." [4]
  5. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Do you want to take a flight? Please phone me. I'll be home, as usual." [5]
  6. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Would you like to go for an ice cream? Please phone me. I'll be at home, as usual." [6]
  7. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Do you want to take a flight? Please phone me. I'll be at home, as usual." [7]
  8. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Would you like to go for an ice cream? Please phone me. I'll be at home, as usual." [8]
  9. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Do you have a craving for ice cream? Please call me. I'll be at home, as usual." [9]

Is there any way we can get this nailed down? -- Tom 09:04, 13 March 2006 (UTC)

Seems most are the same. Some people have "flight" for "ice cream", but assuming "ice cream" is correct, they're all basically the same. "Hi, Marzipan, it's Łukasz. Do you want to go out for ice cream? Please call me. I'll be at home, as usual." You won't have one definitive translation of conversational language. Qermaq - (T/C) Image:Qermaqsigpic.png 04:51, 15 March 2006 (UTC)

EDIT CONFLICT: Well provided our Polish transcript is accurate, Machine Translation seems to agree on several main points:

  1. A greeting to Marzipan.
  2. Identify as Łukasz.
  3. Something to do with ice-cream.
  4. Something related to calling him.
  5. Mention of his house.

That leaves these options as the most probable:

  1. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz speaking. Would you care for some ice-cream? Please phone me. I'll be home, as usual." [10]
  2. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Would you care for some ice-cream? Please phone me. I'll be home, as usual. [11]
  3. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Would you like to go for an ice cream? Please phone me. I'll be at home, as usual." [12]
  4. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Would you like to go for an ice cream? Please phone me. I'll be at home, as usual." [13]
  5. "Hi, Marzipan! This is Łukasz. Do you have a craving for ice cream? Please call me. I'll be at home, as usual." [14]

I'm thinking of a number between one and five... Thunderbird 04:55, 15 March 2006 (UTC)

We want the most conversational version possible. Remember, a word-for-word decoding of a foreign language is usually quite stilted. The Polish will say things differently because that's how the language developed, but if the same person were to say it in fluent English, it'd come out as conversational English. Qermaq - (T/C) Image:Qermaqsigpic.png 04:58, 15 March 2006 (UTC)
Ok, the 2nd sentence is definitely "This is Łukasz", there is no word for "speaking" (although it could be implied from context) (by the way, Lucas would probably be an acceptable conversion of Łukasz), my knowledge of polish doesn't extend much further, but will get my grandmother (who is polish) to have a listen tomorrow and see what she says. -- Z aspiryną, DumbMuscle 21:22, 5 June 2006 (UTC)

[edit] OutKast ref?

Anyone think it's possible that "in the place to be" is an OutKast reference? There are two different songs on Speakerboxxx that use that phrase, "Ghetto Musick" and "Flip-Flop Rock" (and the latter uses it over and over again). It's a bit of a stretch, but TBC have made references to OutKast before, e.g. in spring cleaning and Halloween Fairstival.

[edit] S or F

I don't read transcripts very often, but today I happened across this one that surprised me; I think it's wrong. Currently, Homestar is quoted as saying: And it starts... with... a five. I mean... an "S". I say: F. OptimisticFool 02:05, 18 November 2007 (UTC)

I think it's S, if only because it would be easy to confuse an S with a 5. --DorianGray 02:10, 18 November 2007 (UTC)
It's definitely an "S"... i mean... a five... i mean, there isn't a letter there yet... seriously, it's an S though — DeFender1031*Talk 02:58, 18 November 2007 (UTC)
I hear "F", but only kinda... "F" and "S" sound very similar at this quality... --phlip TC 03:02, 18 November 2007 (UTC)

Three year late reply!!! I just listened to the DVD version and I was really surprised to hear "F" clearly. Like a lot of others 'round here, I always figured it was "S" because that's the only letter I could mistake a 5 for. Now I'm signing on to the "F" camp. Can anyone else check their DVD and confirm this?--Bobo the King 08:59, 25 September 2010 (UTC)

[edit] Why "camdidate" and not "candidate"?

Why does it say "camdidate", and not "candidate" on Marzipan's Answering Machine Version 11.2? Could you please explain to me why it says "camdidate"? --194.218.103.74 12:17, 23 February 2010 (UTC)

Because "camdidate" is what Strong Bad says. --DorianGray 12:21, 23 February 2010 (UTC)

[edit] Your aspirino

When the heavily accented man at the end says "aspirino," isn't this another reference to "Other Days?" This is the second time that someone who is (presumably) foreign says that, even if Strong Bad was just saying random stuff the first time.

I agree, annony who posted this in March. I'm adding this to the Fun Facts.--Bobo the King 04:45, 3 September 2010 (UTC)
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